Conservation

Citizen Science

You can help our scientists protect bird populations worldwide
Photo: Sabrina/ Great Backyard Bird Count
Conservation

Citizen Science

You can help our scientists protect bird populations worldwide

Citizen science programs are central to the efforts of Audubon scientists, who benefit from the sheer volume of data sent in by birdwatchers from around the world. When a citizen scientist reports a sighting (or non-sighting) and bird behavior, climate scientists can better understand the balance between bird populations and changing global temperatures. You, too, can be a citizen scientist and help save populations of bird species around the world. Here are some programs in which you can participate:

Hummingbirds at Home: Log hummingbird sightings from your backyard in order to help scientists understand changing population and behavioral patterns in the face of climate change. Seattle is home to the Anna's hummingbird year-round, so right now is a great time to start monitoring!

Christmas Bird Count: Honor a milestone in conservation action by participating in the longest-run bird count in North America. (We just hosted our 116th count!)

Great Backyard Bird Count: Launched in 1998 by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and National Audubon Society, the Great Backyard Bird Count was the first online citizen-science project to collect data on wild birds and to display results in near real-time. This four-day count occurs each February.

Hummingbirds at Home
Birds

Hummingbirds at Home

Helping Hummingbirds in a Changing World

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Birds and Climate Change
Birds

Birds and Climate Change

Audubon's report identifies at-risk species

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Birds of Seward Park
Birds

Birds of Seward Park

Discover the variety of birds that call the old growth forest home

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How you can help, right now